3 Tips to Improve Hiring in the Summer Slump

It is very common for employers to hire seasonal employees to support their summer workload. Finding candidates for these positions, especially great ones, can be a tough process. You must determine the demographics of temporary help you need, where the best place is to find them, and how to train them in a quick, cost-effective manner. 

Though some candidates are looking for temporary or long-term summer employment, there are many other candidates who opt not to search for summer employment. For this reason, many businesses see a “summer slump”, in which they do not see as many applicants or as many relevant applicants for their open positions. However, this doesn’t mean that you need to hold off on all recruitment until the September Equinox. With a few simple tips, you can drive recruitment and find the right fit for your open position during the summer months.

1. Know Who Your Candidates Are

It can be difficult to find short-term job seekers who can adequately represent your brand. That means you can’t rely on just anyone to fill the position. Invest in finding candidates who are a cultural fit, as much as you would for any full-time position. It may sound easier to put out a job position blast not really caring too much who you land on, however one mis-hire can blemish your reputation. 

Decide what type of job seeker best represents your brand: high school students on summer break, college undergrads looking for an internship, or retired professionals looking to supplement their income. These are general categories of seasonal talent. Consider categorizing your job seekers by their experience or skills. It all depends on your personal recruiting goals.

2. Reach the Best

Get creative and think outside the box on ways to reach your talent. If your brand relies heavily on a consumer site, consider displaying a “We’re hiring seasonal help” banner across the top to guarantee a relevant audience. Since they’re customers who love your brand, they may make ideal candidates for temporary work.

Consider putting a message on your website that directly targets seasonal help. Explain your ideal candidate: motivated, goal-oriented and passionate about your brand, to help to filter out candidates who don’t align. Other initiatives could include college recruiting, social media campaigns, traditional job boards, or a paid advertisement in a high school brochure (think sports games or graduation ceremonies). 

3. Invest in Training 

Think long-term when you’re training your seasonal staff: any one of them could be a returning seasonal employee or could eventually become full-time. Invest big up front since they have the same impact on your customers as any other employee, by creating a comprehensive training program. This will promote consistency throughout your workforce, and help to create loyal candidates who return even after the season is over. For training assistance, check out resources online, ask a mentor for advice or enlist a vendor for help. Seasonal hiring doesn’t have to be complicated. 

Whether you’re hiring short-term seasonal help or looking for permanent members to join your team, it’s always important that you navigate the hiring process with the help of a comprehensive New Jersey Business Insurance program that includes employment practices liability insurance (EPLI). Even if these candidates do not end up joining your team, you are still vulnerable to claims of exclusion, discrimination, and much more, and the last thing you want is to deal with a lawsuit when you should be celebrating the new additions to your team.

About SB One Insurance Agency

At SB One Insurance Agency, we have served the businesses and residents of New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania for more than 60 years. We are a wholly owned subsidiary of SB One Bank, the region’s premier banking institution, and we are prepared to offer you personal, business, employee benefit, and risk management solutions. To learn more about our coverage options, contact our specialists today at (888) 990-0526.